Egyptian Roots/Taking Horus's name too seriously

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This topic contains 18 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Megan Megan 3 weeks ago.

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  • #16136
    Profile photo of Candace Candace 
    Participant

    @kevin

    To my knowledge, we’ve only seen one New Testament name come up, Timothy.

    I didn’t think about that until you just said it but yes Timothy is New Testament. In the Bible Paul writes letters to Timothy from prison to help him take care of the flock (the church) while he was in prison. Timothy was to to be in charge and run the church basically in Paul’s absence but the believers despised him because he was so young

    #16137
    Profile photo of Buz Wallick Buz Wallick 
    Moderator

    Holy shit @pandace88!

    I love threads like this that start putting puzzle pieces we’ve had for awhile together. Things are clicking.

    #16138
    Profile photo of Megan Megan 
    Participant

    More Egyptian mythology thoughts…

    Horus was the son of Isis and Osiris (in some versions – others his mother was Hathor as noted previously)

    Isis and Osiris were brother and sister, Isis is mother, nature, magic – still worshipped today in many pagan religions (which for all their denial of it do share some overlap with satanism). Osiris is the god of the afterlife and one of the things I found particularly interesting about him is that he is often pictured and associated with ostrich feathers – that may be what the feather symbol on the forum page is in reference to.

    #16168
    Profile photo of Megan Megan 
    Participant

    Another thought I had re: the doll in the ritual that PlAndy stumbled in on…Isis had to reassemble Osiris after their brother Set killed him, chopped up his body and scattered all the pieces. This became their creation myth/version of the resurrection/breathing life into a body to blahblahblah stuff, which seems relevant to the creation of maybe confidants.

    Also given that Horus and Set had to wage a battle over who was king, and then Osiris decreed that Horus most definitely was the King, I think that might have to be taken into serious consideration when thinking about who the King card represents.

    https://www.laits.utexas.edu/cairo/teachers/osiris.pdf

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